Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Can You Identify These Weeds?

Weed #1:  These yellow flowers have taken over our property in central Arizona this past month.  The horses were grabbing them up by the mouthful as I walked them past, so I'd like to know what they are called and whether they are poisonous to horses.

Here's a bundle next to one of the tires that the previous homeowners left on the property for us to dispose of, and then next picture is a better closeup.

Weed #2:  These next two pictures are of what my husband called jimson weed.


 Weed #3:

Weed #4:  This moss-like stuff grows where there are small pebbles.  It's soft now and the dogs like to crouch in it since it's the closest thing we've got to grass, but I'm worried this may be what caused all the stickers last spring once it dried up.

 
Weed #5:

Are you familiar with any of these?  I have been pulling weeds in the front yard and on our driveway as they pop up, but the other three acres of property are on their own.  My back wouldn't hold out long enough to pull all of that, and my experience with chemicals is that they cost a lot of money and at the very best only kill a portion of the weed while the rest lives on.  I just want to know which weeds to cut a wide berth around when leading the horses.

14 comments:

Reddunappy said...

Yeah I would be finding out too!

Your county Extension office will be able to help you!

Let us know! I am not familiar with the weeds in Arizona, so wont be much help!

fernvalley01 said...

not a clue , but I am from the frozen north , do you have a district ag office?

SquirrelGurl said...

I will second the comments above about inquiring about these weeds at your county extension service. They should be a division of Arizona State University.

Here's a link I found to their general website: http://extension.arizona.edu/topics/agriculture-and-natural-resources/home-garden-landscape

Looks like they have a Weed Science program.

As for weed control, try vinegar. That's what my Dad uses to control weeds on our farm. He says it works just as well as the chemical stuff. But the only thing you would have to deal with is the smell of vinegar though...

SquirrelGurl said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
SquirrelGurl said...

Gah! Sorry about the double post. it won't let me delete it either...

Camryn said...

I agree with the vinegar, add some dawn dish soap to it actually sticks to the plant. Though some plants that aren't toxic "alive" can become toxic when withering.

appydoesdressage said...

The yellow flower looks like it may be Arizona Poppy.
The white flower is Datura (also called jimsom weed and other common names) and is toxic
I don't know what weed 3 is but weed 4 looks a lot like the stuff here and it is not toxic. It certainly overtakes the lawn though and will kick grass out. Hope you post when you find out what they all are!

Dreaming said...

Yes, definitely take samples of the weeds to the Extension Agency. They have the resources to tell you what the weeds are, whether there are concerns about them and how to control them.
If you had stickers that looked like goat's heads, it sounds like puncture vine. It's hard to tell from the picture, but it's growth pattern looks to be the same. Did it have yellow flowers? Look up Puncture Vine in Google and look at images to compare to what you have.

lilyrose said...

Sorry I don't know the names of those weeds-but I have loads of them sprouting up on mu property. Go to the local hardware store and buy a hula hoe. They work great for getting rid of the weeds here.

Cut-N-Jump said...

Don't bother with the vinegar. I tried it and it would take a whole lot to kill anything. Our weeds seemed to think it was fertilizer.

I second lilyrose and the hulahoe or even a good shovel. While it mainly just lops off the top of them, it is usually enough to take them out. Of course you still need to rake them up and dispose of them- (burn barrels work good for this) it is easier to do when they are small and you get a workout while you are at it.

Nuzzling Muzzles said...

My husband figured out what Weed #1 was: Desert Senna. Now that it hasn't rained for a while, all of these weeds are shriveling up and disappearing. No spraying or hoeing necessary. They are growing among rocks in very hard ground and there are tens of thousands of them, so I never planned on trying to get rid of them. I just wanted to know it anyone who lives or lived in this area knows off the top of her head the names and whether they are toxic to horses. I took all the horses for walks and they weren't interested in eating any of these weeds now that the weeds are dying. They are probably letting off a bad smell or taste.

Laughing Orca Ranch said...

Have now idea what the yellow flowers are. We've got a different kind growing in our pastures. Different because none of my animals, not even my goats will eat it. Now that's starting to get cold here, they're dropping seeds and dying off. They sure do add some beautiful color, though. We used to have sage growing in our pastures, but we tore it all out after Apache ended up with Sage toxicity after gorging on it the first summer after I bought her.

The flat, spreading plant looks like puncture vine. Horrible stuff! We sometimes get it poking through our gravel driveway, and yes, when it matures, it is filled with sharp, painful goathead thorns that spread quickly. We rip 'em out when they are in their immature stage. That's basically the only weed we remove around here.

~Lisa

Nuzzling Muzzles said...

I can see how Weed #4 would look like puncture vine if I took the picture from a few feet away, but this one was taken a few inches away. It's a very soft mossy or grassy type weed that is cool to the touch. We had puncture vine all over at our old house. This is different. When I mentioned stickers, I didn't mean goatheads. I meant little tiny needles that are magnetically attracted to socks and dog hair. We had a bunch of that last spring and then it disappeared, so I've been trying to keep an eye out for which weed causes those needles when it matures. My hay farmer in Nevada hassled me every time he saw me, because I was "letting" my neighbors grow puncture vine. I explained to him that I had no control over what my neighbors did, but he was welcome to go knock on their door. Eventually, we got so sick of him hassling us that we went over to their side of the road when our neighbors were at work and dug up the puncture vine ourselves.

Mikey said...

#2 is a form of Datura, toxic. #5 grows here, I forget what it is, but my horses don't touch it. I pull ALL weeds up, pretty much.
Will email you tomorrow, just finished working and STILL sick, 2 weeks now. My co workers say I have Kennel Cough. Ugh.